Jackson, Mississippi: An American Chronicle of Struggle and Schism

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Salter later recalled in interviews that he had been attacked with brass knuckles and broken glass. He also had cigarettes stubbed out on his back and neck, leaving permanent scars. John Richard Salter Jr. Church in Jackson, Mississippi, where he spoke to the congregation in his torn and bloody shirt in the early s.

Jackson Mississippi an American Chronicle of Struggle and Schism

Photo courtesy of HunterBear. The taunting and torment went on for three hours before police grudgingly ended the protest, mostly to prevent damage to the store when the mob began throwing merchandise.


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A photo taken by Fred Blackwell of the Jackson Daily News forever preserved the moment in history and was later used in various teaching textbooks. In Jackson, Salter earned the nickname "Mustard Man" because the photo showed him drenched in condiments.

Jackson Mississippi an American Chronicle of Struggle and Schism

The Woolworth's demonstration made worldwide headlines, and two weeks later President John F. Kennedy used the flashpoint as a rallying call for a comprehensive national civil rights bill. King immediately agreed and ended up leading a procession of 5, people. That Mr.

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Salter was an educator who joined his students in protest is inspiring. Born on Feb.

His mother was also a teacher. Salter graduated high school in and served a stint in the Army. He pursued his undergraduate degree in social studies from Arizona State University and graduated in — the same year the institution was officially recognized as a state university. He continued his work as a labor union organizer before moving to Jackson, Mississippi, in with his wife, Eldri Johanson. Salter quickly became a civil rights leader and community organizer.

Ed King (activist) - Wikipedia

He and his wife helped organize boycotts of several businesses that practiced discrimination in downtown Jackson. He said he was beaten and ridiculed on numerous occasions for his activism in the Deep South — by both unruly mobs and police. Weeks after the Woolworth's clash he was seriously injured with a colleague when his car was wrecked in what he believed was a rigged automobile accident.

He was also the subject of several smear campaigns and was surveilled by the FBI, which compiled a large dossier on him.

supertechksa.com/includes/dyjajory/bilgisayar-ip-takip-etme.html He retired as a full professor and former departmental chair from the American Indian Studies Department at the University of North Dakota, where he worked from to Salter moved to Pocatello, Idaho, after retirement and remained involved in various civil rights campaigns until his death. Salter's life and his actions remind us that turmoil around the rights of others is everyone's challenge.

Salter spent his life engaged in acts of social justice.

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Salter Jr. Salter was born in Chicago on 14 February After teaching for a year in Wisconsin, he and his wife, Eldri, were inspired by the Freedom Rides to move to Jackson, where John Salter took a teaching position at Tougaloo College. In the fall of he helped organize a boycott of Capitol Street businesses, with activists demanding that stores institute equal hiring practices, use courtesy titles for African American shoppers, and do away with segregated seating and restrooms.

Salter was arrested while picketing in December. Salter and other faculty members went to watch, but Salter decided to join in the protest.

Jackson police did not arrest the activists but instead allowed a group of white men to harass them, eventually beating some and trying to humiliate them. Next ketchup, then spray paint, then more lethal weapons of glass ash trays and sugar jars—and soon there was blood mixed in the mustard—and more blood.

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